UVA Virtual Lab: Nanoscience Class Homepage

"A Hands-on Introduction to Nanoscience and Technology"

or

"We're not in Kansas Anymore!"

ENGR-2500


 

 

This class was developed under a special grant from the National Science Foundation. Its goal is to provide a lab-based hands-on introduction to nanoscience and nanotechnology for early undergraduates of any major (there are no pre-requisites beyond normal college-track high school physics, chemistry & math).

So what will the class cover? First, at the nanoscale, we must confront the fact that Newton’s sensible laws are replaced by the weirdness of quantum mechanics (hence the class’s Wizard of Oz subtitle). The details are bewildering, but for this class you only need to know that electrons begin to act like waves. But all waves act basically the same way. And that means to anticipate how weird electron waves might behave, we can (literally) start by experimenting with water waves (for instance, water waves will explain why manufacturers are putting nanoparticles into sun block).

The second thing that changes at the nanoscale, is that WE can no longer manufacture things directly. Micro-assembly techniques (such as those used in making the integrated circuits of your computer/cell phone/PDA) are based on micro-photography. And images just won’t focus to smaller than a wavelength of light (something we’ll also show with the water waves). But light’s wavelength is at least 10X too large to pattern things at the nanoscale. Instead we have to rely on a process called “self-assembly.” That is, we have to design the parts so they know how we want them to finally come together. The ultimate example of self-assembly? DNA synthesis of protein. But DNA might also someday help us to self-assemble nano electronic circuits. Some people spend years studying self-assembly and DNA. But in this class you’ll find that we can learn the essentials in just a few classes.

But after you’ve programmed the parts to “self-assemble” at the nanoscale, how do you know if they got it right? One way is to use distant cousins of the old-fashion record player called the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscope (whose invention earned two researchers Nobel Prizes). We used the NSF grant to buy six of these instruments. In the labs, you will use these tools to see individual atoms. (To view our full virtual reality recreations of these instruments, click on the photos above).

Finally, we’ll also discuss the boundary between nanoscience and nanotechnology. There is a heck of a lot of the former but not, as yet, a whole lot of the latter. The distinction has produced immense confusion in media from Scientific American to science fiction. What is real? What stands a good chance (or virtually no chance) of ever becoming real? And for the things that do become real, how might they affect us, and the other inhabitants of this world?

ENROLLMENT:

1) The class is now offered in both the fall and spring semesters.

2) For this class, you should enroll in the lecture/discussion meeting plus one of the four lab sections.

3) Limitations on lab equipment and space mean that the class can only accommodate a total of 36 students each semester.

4) Finally (as noted above) this class was designed and funded for early undergraduates. Upperclassmen are still welcome. But to offset UVA's normal early enrollment for upperclassmen, upperclass enrollment in this class will be delayed by ten days.

 
Course Memo

 



Homepage of Previous Class  
     
Images from STM & AFM class labs  

 



Hands-on Nanoscience - Fall 2014

Instructor: John C. Bean

Discussions / Lectures:

Tuesday, 2:00-3:15 pm, Thornton Hall room E-304

Textbook: Nanotechnology - Understanding Small Systems, 2nd Edition, Ben Rogers, Sumita Pennathur and Jesse Adams, CRC Press - Taylor & Francis Group (2011), ISBN 978-1-4398-4920-0

Labs:

Location: Professor Bean's lab Thronton Hall E-111a

Section 1: Wednesday 2:00-3:15 pm
Section 2: Wednesday 3:30-4:45 pm
Section 3: Thursday 2:00-3:15 pm
Section 4: Thursday 3:30-4:45 pm

 

Lecture / Discussion Schedule:

Wk
Class Date

Link to Lecture Notes

Link to supporting webpage with embedded animations, simulations, links to readings & other resources
1
Aug 26
-
2
Sept 2
3
Sept 9
4
Sept 16
5
Sept 23
6
Sept 30
7
Oct 7
8
Oct 14
9
Oct 21
-
10
Oct 28
11
Nov 4
12
Nov 11
13
Nov 18
14
Nov 25
15
Dec 2
   
Supplemental / Retired Class Lectures:
Other possibly useful info:
 

John's Tutorial on Everyday Mathcad (MCD / pdf)

John's Organic Chemistry Cheat Sheet

 

Lab Schedule and Manuals:

NOTE: To prepare for many labs there are homework assignments. These are given in the Homework Assignments table.

Wk
Lab Dates
Topic / Activity
Lab manual / Links to supporting animations, readings and lab equipment used
1
Aug 27, 28
Brief lab orientation meetings: Thornton Hall, Room E114a (basement level, adjacent to loading dock between Thornton and Olsson Halls.

Chance to meet undergraduate lab assistants

One-on-one opportunity to ask further questions about class and labs, or to discuss personal suggestions or requests about the class's content

2
Sept 3, 4
Waves in Springs Lab

Bring to the lab: Spring Lab Manual

Quiz: Lab will begin with quiz on this "Review of Waves" webpage.

Wear jeans or slacks: You'll be working on the floor

3
Sept 10, 11
Waves in Water Lab 1

Bring to the Lab: Water Wave Lab Manual / Report

Quiz:Lab will begin with quiz on the Waves (generic) and Waves (electron) lecture notes, and the equipment section (pages 1-9) of the Ripple Tank Manual

4
Sept 17, 18
Waves in Water Lab 2

Bring to the Lab: Water Wave Lab Manual / Report

5
Sept 24, 25
IC Fab Lab Tour / Demonstration of Photolithography

Quiz: Lab will begin with quiz on these UVA Virtual Lab presentations: How Semiconductors and Transistors Work, How Integrated Circuits are Made, and Optical Photolithography

6
Oct 1, 2
Self-Assembly Lab

Quiz: Lab will begin with a quiz based on the lecture note set: The Need for Self-Assembly

7
Oct 8, 9
Scanning Electron Microscopy Demonstration

Quiz: Lab will begin with quiz on these UVA Virtual Lab presentations: Scanning Probe Microscope, SPM Piezoelectrics, and Scanning Electron Microscope

Our Insect Micrographs

8
Oct 15, 16
Atomic Force Microscope Lab

Quiz: Lab will begin with a quiz on this UVA Virtual Lab presentation: easyScan AFM (quiz must be passed before using the AFM),

Bring to the lab: USB stick to save copies of the AFM images you obtain. Paste your best images into the AFM lab report and submit inTuesday lecture class following th completion of the AFM lab.

10 Oct 22, 23
Scanning Tunneling Microscope Lab 1

Quiz: Lab will begin with quiz on this UVA Virtual Lab presentation: easyScan STM (quiz must be passed before using the STM).

11
Oct 29, 30

Scanning Tunneling Microscope Labs 2 & 3

Use the STM to image atoms on the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

Enhance images using image processing software

Bring to the lab: USB stick to save copies of the STM images you obtain. Paste your best images into the STM lab report and submit in Tuesday lecture class following completion of the three STM labs.

STM Lab Manual

STM Lab Report

Supporting Materials

12
Nov 5, 6
13
Nov 12, 13
Super Hydrophobic Surfaces Lab

Bring to the Lab: Hydrophobicity Lab Manual

Quiz: On Part I (hydrophobicity) of the lecture "Bleeding Edge: Nanomechanics" + the Hydrophobicity Lab Manual. (WARNING: For the quiz you will need the results of a calculation specified on page 5 of the lab manual)

14
Nov 19, 20
Charlottesville CSI: DNA Fingerprinting - Lab 1

Bring to the Lab: UVA DNA Fingerprinting Lab Manual

Quiz: Lab will begin with quiz on the DNA Fingerprinting Lecture Note Set

Do not eat for at least one hour before lab
9
Nov 26, 27

No labs this partially holiday week

-

15
Dec 3, 4
Charlottesville CSI: DNA Fingerprinting - Lab 2

Bring to the Lab: UVA DNA Fingerprinting Lab Manual

Wear blue (we'll be making heavy use of blue stains)

DNA Fingerprinting Lab Manual / Report

Supporting Materials

 

Homework Assignments

General Notes on Assignments:

Assignments are to be typed and submitted in paper form on the indicated due date

Late assignments will not be accepted (ONLY exceptions: certified illness or personal emergency)

ANY assigned reading may be the subject of an in-class pop quiz on its date

To avoid confusion, below I will add assignments only as their due dates approach.

Wk
Due
Assignment
1
Aug 26
Read: Newspaper Article on Gecko Grip (link)

Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of the above newspaper article

Bring to lab: Yourself

2
Sept 2
Read: Textbook's chapter 1

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Bring to lab: Printed copy of Spring Lab Instructions / Report Document (link)

Lab Quiz: On this "Review of Waves" webpage

3
Sept 9
Read: Textbook chapter 2 (through page 36 - because remainder of chapter is either of questionable relevance or is already well covered in our lectures and labs)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 1 (Wed 2 pm): Pick up Nanocarbon kits and submit in lab next week a model of graphite, nanotube or C60. See descriptions in lectures 7,8, or UVA Virtual Lab presentation on Nanocarbon

Bring to Lab: Copy of our Ripple Tank Lab Instructions / Report Document

Lab Quiz: On the Waves (generic) and Waves (electron) lecture notes, and the equipment section (pages 1-9) of the Ripple Tank Manual

4
Sept 16
Read: Textbook Chapter 3: Nanophysics

Submit: Problems 3.9, 3.10 a, c, d (not b), 3.25 (to be pledged / no sharing)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 1 (Wed 2 pm): Return Nanocarbon kits, with bag, at lab meeting.

Students in Lab 2 (Wed 3:30 pm): Pick up Nanocarbon kits and submit in lab next week a model of graphite, nanotube or C60. See descriptions in lectures 7,8, or UVA Virtual Lab presentation on Nanocarbon

Bring to the Lab: Water Wave Lab Manual / Report

5 Sept 23
Read: Chapter 4: Nanomaterials

Submit: Problems 4.5, 4.6, 4.9, 4.17, 4.26, 4.27 (should be a blank to fill in at end of the sentence)
(to be pledged / no sharing)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 2 (Weds 3:30 pm): Return Nanocarbon kits, with bag, at lab meeting.

Students in Lab 3 (Thurs 2 pm): Pick up Nanocarbon kits and submit in lab next week a model of graphite, nanotube or C60. See descriptions in lectures 7,8, or UVA Virtual Lab presentation on Nanocarbon

Lab Quiz: On UVA Virtual Lab presentations How Semiconductors and Transistors Work, How Integrated Circuits are Made, and Optical Photolithography

6
Sept 30
Read:

The first half of the textbook's chapter 5 is about classic, Newtonian, MACROmechanics (rather than nanomechanics), leading to this abbreviated assignment:

READ textbook Chapter 5 - Nanomechanics: Page 160 to end ONLY

AND

"Rupturing the Nanotech Rapture" (w/ more reasons for the abbreviated textbook assignment)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 3 (Thurs 2 pm): Return Nanocarbon kits, with bag, at lab meeting.

Students in Lab 4 (Thurs 3:30 pm): Pick up Nanocarbon kits and submit in lab next week a model of graphite, nanotube or C60. See descriptions in lectures 7,8, or UVA Virtual Lab presentation on Nanocarbon

Lab Quiz: Quiz for Self-Assembly lab based on lecture note set: The Need for Self-Assembly

7
Oct 7
Read:

The textbook's chapter 6 pulls way too many advanced equations out of thin air, giving you little/no idea of how they are derived or correctly applied. Instead, think back to my lecture 3 description of the "Quantum Size Effect" based on the wavelengths and energies of waves that will fit in a small box. Leading to this abbreviated assignment:

READ textbook's Chapter 6 - Nanoelectronics: ONLY pages 185-192 (sections 6.1 - 6.4) AND pages 197-215 (sections 6.7-6.9.1.1).

Submit: Problems 6.6, 6.8, 6.16, 6.24, 6.37 (to be pledged / no sharing)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 4 (Thurs 3:30 pm): Return Nanocarbon kits, with bag, at lab meeting.

Lab Quiz: On UVA Virtual Lab presentations Scanning Probe Microscope, SPM Piezoelectrics, and Scanning Electron Microscope

8
Oct 14

Reading Day - No Lecture

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Lab Quiz: On UVA Virtual Lab presentation easyScan AFM

Bring to Lab: USB stick to save copies of the AFM images you obtain. Paste your best images into the AFM lab report form and submit in Tuesday lecture class following th completion of the AFM lab.

9
Oct 21

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted December 2011 - present) / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 1 (Weds 2:00 pm): Pick up DNA atomic model kits (one kit per pair of students). Completed model to be submitted in lab next week. Follow instructions given at this link, making use of UVA Virtual lab presentations DNA: Big Picture & DNA: Do it Yourself

Submit: Completed AFM lab report form.

Bring to Lab: USB stick to lab to save copies of the STM images you obtain. Paste your best images into the STM lab report form.

Lab Quiz: On UVA Virtual Lab presentation easyScan STM

10
Oct 28 Read: Textbook, Chapter 7: Nanoheat Transfer / Submit: Problems 7.1, 7,2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.6, 7.7, 7,8, 7.9, 7.15 (to be pledged / no sharing)

Read: A nanoscience news article of your own choosing (posted June 2014 - present / Submit: One page ANALYSIS of the scientific content of that nanoscience news article (include URL for article in your report, or if from print article, a copy of it).

Students in Lab 1 (Wed 2 pm): Return DNA atomic model kits, with bag, at lab meeting.

Students in Lab 2 (Weds 3:30 pm): Pick up DNA atomic model kits (one kit per pair of students). Completed model to be submitted in lab next week. Follow instructions given at this link, making use of UVA Virtual lab presentations DNA: Big Picture & DNA: Do it Yourself

Bring to Lab: USB stick to lab to save copies of the STM images you obtain. Paste your best images into the STM lab report form and submit in Tuesday lecture class following the completion of the three STM labs.

11
Nov 4
-
12
Nov 11
-
13
Nov 18
-
14
Nov 25
-
 15
Dec 2
-
 
Dec 16 Final Exam due Tuesday at 9 AM (date/time assigned by the university) in Professor Bean's office (Thornton E-223)